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Jean Bosco Noheli

Personal

Born December 25, 1980 in family of 3 children, two boys and one girl, raised in Gicumbi District, Northern Province, Rwanda.

Married to Monique UMUTONI

Education

2009 Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine, Higher Institute of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry (ISAE-Busogo) (now University of Rwanda)

Professional Experience

April 2012 to present: Field Veterinarian Gorilla Doctors/ Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, Musanze, Rwanda

November 2009 to April 2012: Regional Laboratory Manager, Gorilla Doctors/ Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, Musanze, Rwanda

2016

INITIAL THOUGHTS

Dr. Noel's initial thoughts on his MSc (Wildlife Medicine) training and work...

"I enjoy working with our team members. And I like most seeing a treated gorillas improving after a successful intervention.

The combination of MSc training and work is not an easy one in terms of requirements as you have to attend both class and work calls but they complement each other in terms of professional development.

This course is an opportunity for us to deepen our skills in wildlife health and management so that after the course we can help our countries in all projects and policies on wildlife as source of considerable income for our society but also conserve and protect these creatures as components of ecosystem.

We will also use these skills to perform well our daily gorilla work and join the research network on wildlife and diseases.

We are so thankful for you guys and particularly our supervisors for providing this opportunity and we will continue passing thanking words on behalf of wild animals in this region."


2021

UPDATED THOUGHTS

"My professional path has been successful and impactful because I had the chance to work with people who not only care about wildlife but also inspire and develop young professionals.

The master's program in wildlife health and management was mainly to deepen our ability to handle clinical cases out in the field, efficiently contribute to the wildlife conservation in general and be able to train junior veterinarians with interest in wildlife medicine.

After the program I continued with my role as a field veterinarian. Over the last two years, with the retirement of Dr. Cranfield, our long-time Director, it was time for me to help the Gorilla Doctors team fill that huge gap. I began to appreciate how much the program has impacted my professional growth. I now lead clinical interventions on mountain gorillas and other wild animals in need and I mentor young veterinarians on the aspects of wildlife medicine.

I absolutely think my colleagues see me as being able to contribute more after my training, based on the fact that I am more independent compared to time before the program. We work as one team and individual achievements translate the success of our entire team. Always advanced training—whether hands on training, short course or a degree program—reminds you how much you still need to learn and it equips you for the new challenges. Especially in this domain of wildlife which still holds a lot to discover.

I am so grateful for the support from Docs4greatApes and all individuals who have contributed to make our dreams become a reality. And I hope more veterinarians from Rwanda, DRC and Uganda will benefit from such support and come enhance our teams."

Docs4GreatApes is committed to improving the health of great ape populations, the communities that surround them, and the ecosystem we share, through education.

You can help.